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Purvi Patel Sentenced to 41 Years for Feticide and Neglect of a Dependent

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Purvi Patel Sentenced to 41 Years for Feticide and Neglect of a Dependent
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Between this and that idiotic PRFA BS, this state has left the (relatively) ”modern” 11th century CE in which it normally resides for a trip backward in ...
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Read more of our articles on the Purvi Patel case here. Purvi Patel was sentenced Monday to 41 years in prison on charges of feticide and felony neglect of a dependent after an Indiana jury in early February found her guilty of the charges. She was ordered to serve 20 years in prison after receiving a 30-year sentence on the felony neglect charge, with an additional ten years suspended. Patel received a six-year sentence on the feticide charge, but that will be served concurrently with the 20-year sentence. She will spend five years on probation when she is released from prison. Patel in Jul...

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Homes with heritage: What it really means to own a listed property - Property

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Homes with heritage: What it really means to own a listed property
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The borough of Camden has more than 5,600 listed buildings from different eras, and in varying architectural styles, ranging from the 11th century St ...
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11:17 31 March 2015 Emma Rice Cannon Hall, one of Hampstead’s oldest listed homes, on the market for £28,000,000. Being sold through Savills and Glentree. Archant The borough of Camden has more than 5,600 listed buildings from different eras, and in varying architectural styles, ranging from the 11th century St Pancras Old Church to the Alexandra Road Estate built between 1972 and 1978. Email this article to a friend To send a link to this page you must be logged in. Built around 1728 by R Hughes, this five storey Grade II Listed Georgian house in Church Row, Hampstead is on the market for £...

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Islam, Mohammad, and ISIL - An Interview with a Scholar of Islam ▪ Iranian.com

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Islam, Mohammad, and ISIL - An Interview with a Scholar of Islam
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You said that by the 11th century, Muslims effectively created a dichotomy between religion and the state. In so doing they harkened back to a ...
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  "Even if Muslim interests are affected in hell,  our hearts will go out in sympathy."   Qasim Razvi-  Leader of a militia in Hyderabad- 1948     Michael Cook is a British historian and a scholar of Islamic history.  He is the author of many books, including Hagarism: The Making of the Islamic World, 1977, with Patricia Crone, Muhammad (Past Masters), 1983, The Koran: A Very Short Introduction, Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought, 2001, which won him the Albert Hourani Book Award, and A Brief History of the Human Race, 2005.   He is the recipient of the Howard T. Behrma...

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Let students be students – not customers | Education

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Let students be students – not customers
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When the University of Bologna started offering tuition in the 11th century, there arose what we would now call a snag in the business plan.
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When the University of Bologna started offering tuition in the 11th century, there arose what we would now call a snag in the business plan. Knowledge could not be sold as it was considered a gift from God. However, students paid the teachers a “collectio”, a voluntary gift, and over time these donations became salaries. Inevitably some students did not pay, but in those instances the city authorities would usually stump up. Most of the learners were part-time mature students working as archdeacons and canons of cathedrals, since civil and canon law were the core of the curriculum. So you se...

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The Dress Has Always Been News

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The Dress Has Always Been News
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Do written messages exchanged every three years by Welsh monasteries in the 11th century qualify as “news”? How did we go from that to the news ...
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This story originally appeared on Public BooksMarch 15, 2015 — As “the dress” befuddled the Internet’s hive mind, our newsfeeds swelled. Tumblr and Buzzfeed, recognizing the viral power of a garment that appears gold and white to some but blue and black to others, got the freight train rolling. Soon, bastions of journalism such as the New York Times and Washington Post hopped on board. Experts in cognition assured us that reality is not as fickle as a dress that inexplicably switches colors, but they could not answer a lingering question: is this news? The hive was unhinged by an unholy mix ...

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The Quest for the True Cross of Jesus | Paul N. Anderson

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The Quest for the True Cross of Jesus
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When the test was conducted at Oxford, however, Georges Kazan and Tom Higham reported that the relic dates from the 11th century CE, so it cannot ...
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This fifth episode of CNN's Finding Jesus special focuses on the Byzantine era, three centuries after the ministry of Jesus, when Helena, the mother of Constantine, traveled to Palestine to find "the true cross of Jesus," as well as other artifacts that might be valued as relics. Before Constantine became Emperor, Christians were somewhat unevenly persecuted by the Romans, especially during the reign of Diocletian (284-305 CE). During Constantine's reign (306-337 CE), however, he converted to Christianity and lifted the ban against the Christian faith in 313 CE. The location of many Christia...

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Egyptian Earplugs And The Importance Of Oversight In East Ramapo

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Egyptian Earplugs And The Importance Of Oversight In East Ramapo
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Some have argued that the numerical magnitude of the frogs was the power of the plague (Rashi, 11th century France) while others point to alternate ...
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Each year on Passover, I get chills when we recount the plagues against Egypt: Blood, boils, hail, and death of first born children represent the stuff of horror films. And yet, the second plague tends to stand out for me. “The Nile shall swarm with frogs and they shall come up and enter your palace, your bedchamber, and your bed, the houses of your courtiers and your people, and your ovens and your kneading bowls” [Exodus 7:28].  Frogs, although slimy, do not in my mind match the horror of other plagues. Some have argued that the numerical magnitude of the frogs was the power of the plague ...

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Maybe Theodoric of York, Medieval Barber had the cure for one superbug

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Maybe Theodoric of York, <b>Medieval</b> Barber had the cure for one superbug
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One of Steve Martin's most hilarious Saturday Night Live characters was Theodoric of York, Medieval Barber. Well, it turns out those primitive ...
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Scientists say thee ancient cure is for eye infections dating back to the 10th Century. They are “dumbfounded” at it’s ability to kill MRSA after a series of tests in Britain and the U.S. during the past year. That the Anglo-Saxon recipe, which includes wine, garlic, and bile from a cow’s stomach, could hold the key to defeating MRSA came about after a chance discussion between experts at the University of Nottingham last year. The cure came from Dr. Christina Lee, an expert in Old English, who told microbiologists about the Bald’s Leechbook – an Anglo-Saxon medical textbook kept in the Brit...

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Medieval Remedy for Modern Superbugs

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<b>Medieval</b> Remedy for Modern Superbugs
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The testing of the ancient remedy was the idea of Dr. Lee, Associate Professor in Viking Studies and member of the University's Institute for Medieval ...
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A one thousand year-old Anglo-Saxon remedy for eye infections, which originates from a manuscript in the British Library, has been found to kill the modern-day superbug MRSA in an unusual research collaboration at The University of Nottingham. Dr. Christina Lee, an Anglo-Saxon expert from the School of English, has enlisted the help of microbiologists from University’s Centre for Biomolecular Sciences to recreate a 10th century potion for eye infections from Bald’s Leechbook, an Old English leatherbound volume in the British Library, to see if it really works as an antibacterial remedy. The ...

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Medieval Potion Found to Cure MRSA

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<b>Medieval</b> Remedy Shows Promise in Curing Staph Infection
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A 10th-century medicine that was originally used to treat eye infections may also be able to cure staph infections. Researchers at the University of ...
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TIME Health Infectious Disease 1,000-Year-Old Remedy Could Help Cure Superbug Mixture of onion, garlic, wine and cow stomach bile found to combat staph infections A 10th-century medicine that was originally used to treat eye infections may also be able to cure staph infections. Researchers at the University of Nottingham recreated an ancient potion recipe from Bald’s Leechbook, one of the oldest medical texts in existence. By following the recipe steps precisely, including using a wine from a thousand-year-old vineyard, researchers developed a medicine that was found to kill 90% of MRSA bact...

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