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Cantamus choir to sing out loud across the festive season

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The earliest offering is three pieces for men's voices from the Montpellier Codex, an intriguing compilation of 13th-century polyphonic works.
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WEST Dorset choir Cantamus will be giving three concerts across the area during December. The programme, All So Still, is packed full of beautiful seasonal songs sure to get audiences in the mood for the festive period. The earliest offering is three pieces for men’s voices from the Montpellier Codex, an intriguing compilation of 13th-century polyphonic works. In a sublime contrast, this will be followed by three pieces for women’s voices from Benjamin Britten’s haunting Ceremony of Carols. The concert will also include a tribute to composer and arranger David Willcocks, who passed away last year; the eponymous All So Still and two other carols by 20th-century composer Richard Lloyd; and the favourite of many Cantamus members, O Magnum M...
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When English embroidery took Europe by storm

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The centrepiece of the exhibition is a breathtaking display of the monumental embroideries produced for the church in the late 13th century and first ...
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At a time when we struggle to identify what, if anything, the UK exports to the world with any panache or in any abundance, the V&A provides a timely reminder of an era when England led the western world in the manufacture and export of exquisite gold and silk embroidery. Such was its desirability that European patrons even afforded it its own name: ‘Opus Anglicanum’ – English work. The extent of England’s trade in fine embroidery is spelt out at the beginning of the V&A’s comprehensive and scholarly new exhibition, ‘Opus Anglicanum: Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery’. A map details textile trading routes stretching east and south to the royal courts of France and Spain and on to Europe’s religious centre, Rome, and, more unexp...
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When English embroidery took Europe by storm

English
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In a poignant touch, the exhibition curators have reunited what must once have been commonplace 14th-century tools – needle cases, a thimble, tiny ...
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At a time when we struggle to identify what, if anything, the UK exports to the world with any panache or in any abundance, the V&A provides a timely reminder of an era when England led the western world in the manufacture and export of exquisite gold and silk embroidery. Such was its desirability that European patrons even afforded it its own name: ‘Opus Anglicanum’ – English work. The extent of England’s trade in fine embroidery is spelt out at the beginning of the V&A’s comprehensive and scholarly new exhibition, ‘Opus Anglicanum: Masterpieces of English Medieval Embroidery’. A map details textile trading routes stretching east and south to the royal courts of France and Spain and on to Europe’s religious centre, Rome, and, more unexp...
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New Thoughts on the Demise of Greenland's Norse Settlements

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... analyzed data on the settlement patterns, diet, and landscape of the Norse living in Greenland from the eleventh century to the mid-fifteenth century, ...
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TASILIKULOOQ, GREENLAND—Science Magazine reports that the North Atlantic Biocultural Organization has analyzed data on the settlement patterns, diet, and landscape of the Norse living in Greenland from the eleventh century to the mid-fifteenth century, when they disappeared. It had been thought that the Norse were primarily farmers whose crops and livestock failed to support them when the Little Ice Age set in, but new evidence suggests that the Norse spread to Iceland and Greenland in the pursuit of walrus ivory, which was highly valued in medieval Europe. Analysis of human remains from Norse cemeteries indicates that the settlers relied more heavily on marine animals for food as temperatures fell and it became harder to farm, even thou...
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Alzey: Untergegangene Welt der Klöster

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Alzey: The lost world of the monasteries
German
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Die meisten davon wurden um das 12. Jahrhundert erbaut. Im Europa des 12. und 13. Jahrhunderts, einer Zeit des Umbruchs, stellte sich ein „Hunger ...
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Most of them were built in the 12th century. In the Europe of the 12th and 13th century, a time of change, it turned a "hunger...
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Von Gertrude BormetALZEY - Sphärisch erklang das „Ave Maria“ von Claudio Monteverdi durch den Kirchenraum von St. Joseph, gesungen vom mehrstimmigen Chor „Canticum Sacrum” unter der Leitung von Kurt Steffens. Es war die Einstimmung zu der Veranstaltung „600 Jahre Klöster in Alzey, Information Impuls zu den zehn Klöstern“. Pfarrer Wolfgang Bretz referierte sachkundig über die Zisterzienser-, Augustiner-, Antoniter und Kapuzinerklöster in und um Alzey. „Es gab eine reichhaltige, aber untergegangene Welt der Alzeyer Klöster“, sagte er. Die meisten davon wurden um das 12. Jahrhundert erbaut. Im Europa des 12. und 13. Jahrhunderts, einer Zeit des Umbruchs, stellte sich ein „Hunger nach Gott“ ein, ein geistlicher Neuaufbruch mit der Sehnsucht ...
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By Gertrude BormetALZEY - spherical that rang out "Ave Maria" by Claudio Monteverdi through the nave of St. Joseph, sung by the polyphonic choir "Canticum Sacrum" under the direction of Kurt Steffens. It was the prelude to the event "600 years monasteries in Alzey, information pulse to the ten monasteries". Parish priest Wolfgang Bretz spoke knowledgeably about the Cistercian, Augustine, Antonian and Capuchin monasteries in and around Alzey. "There was a rich, but vanished world of the Alzeyer monasteries," he said. Most of them were built in the 12th century. A spiritual new departure with the longing turned a "hunger for God", in the Europe of the 12th and 13th century, a time of change of...
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Western Buys Ancient Manuscript That Started Holy Communion Debate

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Radbertus's text was very popular in the Middle Ages. Teviotdale says it was copied over and over again. Of course it was also very contentious - not ...
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With the help of a $70,000 grant, Western Michigan University recently purchased a more than 800 year old Latin manuscript. It’s now the oldest complete text in the university’s collection - and it’s no bigger than the pocket-size books you might see at Barnes & Noble. What’s written in this tiny book is even more interesting. It’s a copy of one of the first texts to talk about transubstantiation. That’s the idea that when Catholics eat the sacramental bread and wine in church - they are literally eating the body and blood of Jesus Christ. This is one of the views that divided Catholics and Protestants - many of whom see the bread and wine as more symbolic. Elizabeth Teviotdale is the assistant director of Western’s Medieval Institute. S...
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Tegernsee: Kloster, Schloss, Touristenmagnet

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Tegernsee: Monastery, Castle, tourist magnet
German
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Das Leben im Kloster Tegernsee erlosch bereits nach der Säkularisierung im 10. Jahrhundert. Allerdings wurde es bereits im frühen 11. Jahrhundert ...
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Life in the monastery of Tegernsee died out already in the 10th century after the secularization. However, it was already in the early 11th century...
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Die ersten Ansiedlungen am Tegernsee sind seit dem Mittelalter urkundlich belegt. Legenden ranken sich um die Gründung des Klosters und echte Helden schrieben hier Geschichte. Das Tal birgt einige Mysterien. Der Blick von Gut Kaltenbrunn auf ein Tal mit Geschichte(n) Das Kloster Tegernsee ist eine im 8. Jahrhundert gegründete ehemalige Abtei der Benediktiner am Tegernsee. Die Legende, wie sie im Passio Sancto Qurini vom Ende des 9. Jahrhunderts überliefert ist, besagt, dass zwei Brüder, Oatkar und Adalbert aus der Adelsfamilie Huosi die erste Kirche und Glaubensgemeinschaft gegründet haben. Sie lebten zur Zeit des Königs Pipin mit ihren Familien bei Hofe. Der Sage nach überlistete der König Oatkar, nachdem er dessen Sohn erschlagen hatte...
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The first settlements on Lake Tegernsee are documented since the middle ages. Legends to the founding of the monastery and real heroes made history here. The Valley carries some mysteries. The view from good Kaltenbrunn on a valley with stories the Tegernsee Abbey is a former monastery of the Benedictine monastery at Tegernsee was founded in the 8th century. The, as it is known in the Passio Sancto Qurini by the end of the 9th century, legend, that two brothers, Oatkar and Adalbert of the noble family of the Huosi founded the first church and denomination. They lived at the time of the King Pipin with their families at court. According to the legend, the King Oatkar outsmarted, after he had slain his son...
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En librairie: le plus mystérieux manuscrit du monde

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Bookstore: the most mysterious manuscript in the world
French
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Une datation au carbone14 place la fabrication du parchemin au XVe siècle. Les experts se perdent en conjectures : s'agit-il d'un véritable mode ...
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A dating to the carbone14 place manufacturing of the parchment in the 15th century. Experts get lost in conjecture: is there a way...
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(Agence Science-Presse) Le manuscrit de Voynich fascine les amateurs de mystères depuis des siècles : 234 pages écrites dans un langage indéchiffrable, parsemées d’illustrations tout aussi étranges. Son public sera à présent élargi, avec la publication intégrale sous la forme d’un livre en bonne et due forme. Cliquer sur la photo pour agrandir Il existait une version accessible gratuitement en ligne depuis 2004 mais autrement, pour qui voulait le voir « en vrai », il fallait se rendre à la bibliothèque Beinecke de l’Université Yale, au Connecticut, propriétaire du manuscrit depuis 1961. Voynich est le nom de son plus ancien propriétaire connu, un Américain d’origine polonaise, décédé en 1930 et qui prétendait l’avoir acheté en Italie en ...
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(Agence Science-Presse) The Voynich manuscript fascinates lovers of mysteries for centuries: 234 pages written in an indecipherable language, peppered equally weird illustrations. His audience will be now expanded, with the full publication in the form of a book in the proper manner. Click on the photo to enlarge there a version available for free online since 2004 but otherwise, who wanted to see it "in real", he had to go to the library Beinecke at Yale University in Connecticut, owner of the manuscript since 1961. Voynich is the name of his oldest known owner, an American of Polish origin, who died in 1930, and who claimed to have bought it in Italy in...
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Britain is in the middle of a treasure-hunting boom

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The Domesday Book, a survey of 11th-century England, suggests that south-east Norfolk was the most densely populated part of the country.
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BRITAIN is turning into a nation of treasure hunters. In both 2014 and 2015 there were over 1,000 reported “treasure finds”, the most since records began. (The figures exclude Scotland, which keeps track of its own loot.) Two-thirds of the finds dated from before 1500, including a smattering from the Bronze Age. The rise in the number of discoveries reflects a growing interest in tramping around in muddy fields with metal detectors. But legal changes may also be playing a part. Not all regions of Britain are equally well endowed with treasure, whose complex legal definition refers to a find’s age, size and metallic composition. Norfolk has long been the place to look: in 2012-15 it accounted for a tenth of all English finds. There are ri...
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Thursday Top Ten: Medieval Buildings And Architectural Sights In Hungary

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... The Pécsvárad Abbey was a Benedictine monastery established by Hungary's state founder king St. Stephen in the first decades of the 11th century.
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In Hungary Today’s new weekly series “Thursday Top Ten” our readers can learn about the most interesting things one can find about Hungary in connection with a concrete topic. In the coming weeks we are focusing on the amazingly rich architectural heritage of the Carpathian basin either in chronological or thematic order from the ancient times to today. Our second target are the medieval architectural sights of Hungary, namely those historic churches, abbeys, castles and fortresses that were built between the 10th and 15th century but visitors can find their remains still today. 1. Benedictine Abbey of Pécsvárad  The Pécsvárad Abbey was a Benedictine monastery established by Hungary’s state founder king St. Stephen in the first decades o...
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