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Armenian Art Featured at Monumental Metropolitan Museum Exhibit on Jerusalem

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By the 12th century, they had built the Cathedral of St. James, and with the Byzantines and Franciscans had become the guardians of the Church of ...
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Gospel Book Wash and ink on paper Copied by Nerses the Abbot Canon Tables From a Gospel Book Tempera, gold, and ink on parchment 1193, Monastery of Poghoskan (P’awloskan or Pawoskan), near Hromkla, Anatolia Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, Acquired by Henry Walters By Florence Avakian Special to the Mirror-Spectator NEW YORK — An Armenian monk from Greater Armenia, in the late 14th century wrote, “Jerusalem is the centre from which all laws, grace and prophecy emanate.” Today, Jerusalem is a city of continuing and turbulent conflict among the proponents of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. But in the epic years of 1000 to 1400, it was home to many cultures, faiths and people, more so than at any other time in its history. And the Armenian c...
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Armenian Art Featured at Monumental Metropolitan Museum Exhibit on Jerusalem

English
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In the 11th century, Armenians became allies of the Crusaders and attained new power following the latter's conquest of Jerusalem. It is also ...
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Gospel Book Wash and ink on paper Copied by Nerses the Abbot Canon Tables From a Gospel Book Tempera, gold, and ink on parchment 1193, Monastery of Poghoskan (P’awloskan or Pawoskan), near Hromkla, Anatolia Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, Acquired by Henry Walters By Florence Avakian Special to the Mirror-Spectator NEW YORK — An Armenian monk from Greater Armenia, in the late 14th century wrote, “Jerusalem is the centre from which all laws, grace and prophecy emanate.” Today, Jerusalem is a city of continuing and turbulent conflict among the proponents of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. But in the epic years of 1000 to 1400, it was home to many cultures, faiths and people, more so than at any other time in its history. And the Armenian c...
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Northwestern scientists go high-tech to uncover the secret hidden on top of a 16th century book

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... Maryland, about 15 years ago, multispectral imaging was used to successfully reveal some erased texts in a 10th century manuscript found in a 13th ...
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By Catherine Chen Researchers at Northwestern University are relighting lost history by identifying “ghost” texts on a degraded manuscript used as the cover of a book printed in Italy in the early 16th century. The book, “Works and Days,” was originally written by Greek poet Hesiod in the 8th century B.C. Northwestern has a copy of the book, printed in 1537 in Venice. The book is bound in parchment with text on the parchment’s inner surface. The outer surface of the manuscript was degraded after centuries of use, and the images of the text inside became visible to the naked eyes. Although they could see the text, researchers couldn’t identify specific words with human eyes, said Marc Walton, senior scientist at the Center for Scientific ...
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Northwestern scientists go high-tech to uncover the secret hidden on top of a 16th century book

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The project was initiated by an NU librarian who was interested in book binding styles of the 15th century. But after Works and Days was found at NU's ...
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By Catherine Chen Researchers at Northwestern University are relighting lost history by identifying “ghost” texts on a degraded manuscript used as the cover of a book printed in Italy in the early 16th century. The book, “Works and Days,” was originally written by Greek poet Hesiod in the 8th century B.C. Northwestern has a copy of the book, printed in 1537 in Venice. The book is bound in parchment with text on the parchment’s inner surface. The outer surface of the manuscript was degraded after centuries of use, and the images of the text inside became visible to the naked eyes. Although they could see the text, researchers couldn’t identify specific words with human eyes, said Marc Walton, senior scientist at the Center for Scientific ...
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Monheim: Archäologen finden historischen Kanal

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Monheim: Archaeologists find historic Canal
German
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Oft hätten Städte frühe Befestigungen aus einem Wall und einer Holzkonstruktion im 14. und 15. Jahrhundert noch einmal mit Ziegeln befestigt.
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Often, cities would have early fixtures of a wall and a wooden structure in the 14th and 15th century once again secured with bricks.
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Mirko Busch steht zwei Meter tief unten in einer Baugrube an der Turmstraße. Gegen die Kälte hat er eine dicke Wollmütze tief ins Gesicht gezogen und fertigt sehr konzentriert die maßstabsgerechte Zeichnung des eckigen Klinkerkanals aus dem 18. Jahrhundert an. "Der ist noch recht gut erhalten", sagt der Grabungstechniker der Firma Fundort mit Blick auf die roten Steine. Am frühen Mittwochnachmittag waren Bauarbeiter bei den Ausschachtungsarbeiten für den neuen Kanal auf die historische Ableitung aus Feldbrandsteinen gestoßen. Weil bei den Straßenarbeiten und Ausschachtungen in der historischen Monheimer Altstadt immer wieder mit Funden aus der Vergangenheit gerechnet werden muss, begleitet der Landschaftsverband Rheinland (LVR) alle dies...
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Armenian Art Featured at Monumental Metropolitan Museum Exhibit on Jerusalem

English
Snippet: 
NEW YORK — An Armenian monk from Greater Armenia, in the late 14th century wrote, “Jerusalem is the centre from which all laws, grace and ...
Body: 
Gospel Book Wash and ink on paper Copied by Nerses the Abbot Canon Tables From a Gospel Book Tempera, gold, and ink on parchment 1193, Monastery of Poghoskan (P’awloskan or Pawoskan), near Hromkla, Anatolia Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, Acquired by Henry Walters By Florence Avakian Special to the Mirror-Spectator NEW YORK — An Armenian monk from Greater Armenia, in the late 14th century wrote, “Jerusalem is the centre from which all laws, grace and prophecy emanate.” Today, Jerusalem is a city of continuing and turbulent conflict among the proponents of Judaism, Christianity and Islam. But in the epic years of 1000 to 1400, it was home to many cultures, faiths and people, more so than at any other time in its history. And the Armenian c...
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Face of Robert The Bruce reconstructed showing Scottish king had leprosy

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It is likely that the 14th century king kept his condition a secret fearing he would be shunned, and the illness is not specifically mentioned in documents ...
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The Scottish King, who ruled from 1306 until his death in 1329 aged around 55, launched campaigns throughout Scotland, England and Ireland, including the battle of ­Bannockburn in 1314 where he ­defeated the armies of Edward II. No reliable visual depictions of Robert the Bruce were made when he was alive and written records tell us nothing about his appearance so it is the first time his face has been seen for more than 700 years.  The project was led by Dr Martin MacGregor, a senior lecturer at the University of Glasgow, who was ­inspired by the recent reconstruction of the face of Richard III. “The case of Richard III revealed how far the technology had advanced and I saw an opportunity to apply the technology to the Hunterian skull h...
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Christie's, Old Masters Day Sale, London, Dec 9

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“The Trinity,” on gold ground panel, pointed top, by The Master of the Misericordia (Florence active second half of the 14th century). Estimate: GB£ ...
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The auction offers paintings by old masters. The sale features painters such as Jacob More, Joos de Momper II, Ambrosius Bosschaert II, and the circle of Sir Peter Paul Rubens among others.What: Auction of Paintings by Old MastersWhere: Christie’s, 8 King St, St. James's, London SW1Y 6QT, UKWhen: December 9, 10.30amPublic Viewing: December 3-4, 12pm-5pm, December 5-7, 9am-4:30pm, December 6, 9am-8pm, December 8, 9am-3pmTop Lots of the Sale:* A group portrait of four Venetian senators, bust-length, oil on canvas, by Domenico Tintoretto (Venice 1560-1635). Estimate: GB£ 80,000 - GB£ 120,000 (US$ 101,920 - US$ 152,880)* “Christ on the Road to Calvary,” oil on canvas, by Scipione Pulzone (Gaeta 1544-1598 Rome). Estimate: GB£ 80,000 - GB£ 120...
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Penn State Evan Pugh Professor of Art History Anthony Cutler stands in front of the Great Wall of ...

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... Byzantine Studies Conference — in the same session as Cutler, who presented “Raising Lazarus in Seventh-Century Alexandria” — about an ivory ...
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Evan Pugh Professor of Art History Anthony Cutler may already have a long and impressive curriculum vitae, but he continues to add new lines of acclaim. This fall, he accepted an invitation to present at the 34th World Congress of Art History in Beijing, China. The international conference, which takes place every four years, hosted 500 presenters and 2,300 auditors, with the talks translated into seven screens simultaneously. Cutler spoke about authenticity and elusion in art. “Authenticity is a complicated and nuanced concept that evokes notions of truth and sentiments of morality,” explained Cutler. “It is even more difficult when you are translating it into other languages. In Mandarin, a better word may be ‘autopsy,’ because it conf...
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Northwestern scientists go high-tech to uncover the secret hidden on top of a 16th century book

English
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After the 14th century, scholars began to seek ways to apply Roman law to the practical legal needs of the day. Walton said finding the results was a ...
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By Catherine Chen Researchers at Northwestern University are relighting lost history by identifying “ghost” texts on a degraded manuscript used as the cover of a book printed in Italy in the early 16th century. The book, “Works and Days,” was originally written by Greek poet Hesiod in the 8th century B.C. Northwestern has a copy of the book, printed in 1537 in Venice. The book is bound in parchment with text on the parchment’s inner surface. The outer surface of the manuscript was degraded after centuries of use, and the images of the text inside became visible to the naked eyes. Although they could see the text, researchers couldn’t identify specific words with human eyes, said Marc Walton, senior scientist at the Center for Scientific ...
Link to Story: 

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